The Anthology Film Archives presents a selection of avant-garde shorts, including films by Esther Shatavsky, Marjorie Keller, Luther Price, Manuel De Landa, Francis Lee, and Stom Sogo. Erik Piil, the Digital Archivist at Anthology Film Archives, will present this collection of short films. Preservation through a partnership with the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Esther Shatavsky
BEDTIME STORY
1981, 6 minutes, 16mm-to-35mm blow-up. Preserved with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.
A collage film masterpiece by Esther Shatavsky that was screened at the Collective for Living Cinema amongst other venues back in the day. A work made as much from splicing tape as it is from celluloid.

Marjorie Keller
SIX WINDOWS
1979, 7 minutes, 16mm. Preserved with support from the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.
An important figure in the New York City film community who died at age 43, Marjorie Keller made SIX WINDOWS as a self-portrait of sorts even though it focuses on the view out the window of her Rhode Island home. Pans, dissolves, super-impositions of color and negative imagery combine with the filmmakers’ voice on the soundtrack to express, as she wrote, “a moody record of that place and my peace of mind.”

Luther Price
JELLYFISH SANDWICH
1994, 17 minutes, Super 8-on-digital. Digital preservation by Anthology Film Archives with support from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.
Three intercut films create a swirling, psychotronic experience.

Manuel DeLanda
MAGIC MUSHROOM MOUNTAIN MOVIE
1981, 10 minutes, Super 8mm-to-digital.
Shot in 1973 but not edited until years later, this rarely-screened Jodorowsky-ian Mexican travelogue is surprisingly lovely and, for DeLanda, relatively restrained.

Francis Lee
ILLUMINATIONS #2
1975, 8 minutes, video.
Francis Lee was an accomplished WWII veteran and independent filmmaker who also adopted video in its infancy. This abstract tape of video synthesized images was produced at the Experimental Television Center in Binghamton, NY. Music is by a young group by the name of The Pink Floyd.

Stom Sogo
GUIDED BY VOICES (Original Version)
2000, 10 minutes, video.
Stom Sogo was a brilliant media artist who left his native Japan for America while still in high school. He attended college in NYC and became a central figure in the mid-1990s experimental film community before returning home. GUIDED BY VOICES, a lyrically intense stroboscopic shock to the system, is quite possibly his masterwork. Featured in the 2002 Whitney Biennial, Sogo re-edited this piece a number of times before his untimely death at the age of 37 at his apartment in Kyoto.